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Setting up a SAN boot LUN for Windows Server

You can boot a host from a storage system LUN instead of an internal hard disk. SAN booting can help to improve system availability, enable centralized administration, and eliminate the costs associated with maintaining and servicing hard drives.

Before you begin

About this task

Fibre Channel SAN booting does not require support for special SCSI operations; it is not different from any other SCSI disk operation. The HBA uses code in the BIOS that enables the host to boot from a LUN on the storage system.

iSCSI SAN booting also uses code in the BIOS that enables the host to boot from a LUN on the storage system. However, you need to set specific parameters in the BIOS to enable SAN booting.

Steps

  1. Enable BootBIOS on the HBA.

    BootBIOS firmware is installed on your HBA, but it is disabled by default. For information about how to enable BootBIOS on the HBA, see your HBA vendor-specific documentation.

  2. Add the HBA initiator to an igroup.

    You use this igroup to specify the host that can access the boot LUN. To add the initiator to the igroup, you can enter the WWPN for Fibre Channel HBAs or the iSCSI node name for iSCSI HBAs. For information about creating and managing igroups, see the SAN Administration Guide (formerly the Block Access Management Guide for iSCSI and FC) for your version of Data ONTAP.

  3. Restrict the HBA to a single path to the boot LUN. You can add additional paths after Windows is installed and you have a multipathing solution in place.

    To limit a single path to the boot LUN, you can use a Data ONTAP feature called port sets. You create a port set, add the port (or LIF) to the port set, and then bind the port set to an igroup. Port sets are supported for Fibre Channel (Data ONTAP operating in 7-Mode and clustered Data ONTAP) and for iSCSI (clustered Data ONTAP only). For more information about port sets, see the SAN Administration Guide (formerly the Block Access Management Guide for iSCSI and FC) for your version of Data ONTAP.

  4. Create the LUN that you want to use as a boot device and map it to the igroup as LUN ID 0.

    For information about creating LUNs, see the SAN Administration Guide (formerly the Block Access Management Guide for iSCSI and FC) for your version of Data ONTAP.

  5. For iSCSI HBAs, configure the following boot BIOS settings:

    • Initiator IP
    • iSCSI node name
    • Adapter boot mode

    For more information about configuring the boot BIOS, refer to your HBA vendor-specific documentation.

  6. Use your HBA vendor's BootBIOS utility to configure the LUN as a boot device.

    Refer to your HBA vendor-specific documentation for instructions.

  7. Reboot the host and enter the host BIOS utility.
  8. Configure the host BIOS to make the boot LUN the first disk device in the boot order.

    Refer to your host documentation for instructions.

  9. Obtain the HBA device drivers for your version of Windows.
  10. Install the Windows Server operating system and the HBA device driver on the boot LUN.

    Refer to your HBA vendor-specific documentation for instructions.

  11. Install the Data ONTAP DSM for Windows MPIO.